Super Sizing works for Fast Food – not business!

“Lean” organizations are so common today. Doing more with less is such a popular slogan. While the Portfolio of projects, initiatives and tasks is “super-sized”, the staff to complete all of this work is not big enough to get it all done. If resource demand is much higher than capacity, some things just aren’t going to get done, projects will fail, mistakes will be made and people are going to be very unhappy. This is a sure way to lose the best people.

Your organization will always have tons of ideas for improving business, improving processes or buying the latest technology. But you can’t do it all! However, you can stick to a very solid corporate strategy and prioritize what gets done based on the strategy.

Right-sizing the Portfolio of Projects and Initiatives:
1. Develop a clear, solid Strategy based on your organization’s core competency.
2. Communicate the strategy so that everyone knows how to translate the strategy into what gets done.
3. Develop a method to determine value of projects and initiatives (relate to strategy and other benefits to be realized).
4. Prioritize the portfolio of projects and match resource capacity and demand.

While your organization certainly is made up of superstars, they aren’t super human. There really are only 24 hours in a day and you really do have finite resources.

Inspiration

I thought I would spend just a few minutes on some of the popular social media sites to get inspired for posting here. I thought this would help me come up with a good topic. The first site I went to (not going to mention the name of the site as I like it) didn’t help me come up with anything but it did lead me to go look at Pinterest.

I am addicted to Pinterest. It shows how imaginative people can be. It can be a bit hard to just spend a few minutes on the site.

I think if you are in the dumps, go look at Pinterest, it can cheer you up. If you are bored with work or don’t like your job, go look at Pinterest to remind you that you work to live. On Pinterest you will see where you can go in the world or cool things you might want.

Next time I write a post, I will try a different method for inspiration. Like all bloggers, I am often trying to figure out what is the subject that everyone is interested in so that millions will visit my site. I have failed miserably in finding that subject but I will keep trying. I probably should have more pictures – like Pinterest.

10 Ideas to help ensure People in your Organization are Happy

I wanted to discuss a positive theme today and this came to mind – how to help ensure a happy work force. I read earlier this week that happy people are more productive. So I thought about the places I have worked and put together these points. I am sure there are more ideas and I would like to hear them.

1. Build teams that work well together. This may seem naive and impossible but it can be done. Provide team training so everyone knows how a good team should work. Most work places have some people that aren’t team players. Hopefully you have work where they can be independent.

2. Hire happy, positive people and keep them happy.

3. I don’t know many people who work well in an environment led by a micro manager or dictator type leader. A leader needs to care about the people in the organization. The best leaders have a sense of humor and ability to motivate and inspire.

4. If people can make mistakes without being beaten up over the mistake, more creativity and innovation will occur as people learn from their mistakes and fix problems before it is too late. And the work force will be happier not living in fear of making a mistake.

5. Everyone is motivated differently and has a different personality. Do you recognize individuality? Can you get the best out of your people? People need to be rewarded when they do a good job. This varies quite a bit according the each person’s personality.

6. Everyone appreciates the occasional free lunch or other social events and parties.

7. I don’t know any people who like bosses that yell all the time. Do you?

8. I think most people like friendly, approachable bosses. I certainly do!

9. The leaders of the organization set the core values and the culture. You can make it so that people like coming to work.

10. When people are really overworked, they are not efficient and not happy. Of course this is about life-work balance.

Your thoughts?

The Power of Owning your Results

I was recently asked what did I learn early that I have been able to use throughout my career. My answer is the power of taking ownership of your results.

This goes back to a time when I was in an organization where people were very de-motivated. Things just weren’t going well. We were doing some projects that we really didn’t think we should be doing (weren’t feasible) but we had no choice. We had to do what top management said to do.

At one point we landed a very big project with a good deal of risk, visibility and pressure from our top leader. We had a very lean project team and a very tight schedule. There were team members that didn’t get along. Since many team members were thinking more about polishing up their resumes and getting out of this job nightmare, I was very worried about our ability to pull this off. But I am a stubborn and determined Project Manager.

This will sound crazy but stay with me! I took these very cynical Engineers to a motivational presentation. I expected that most of them would just be happy to get away from the office for a day but they listened and really got it. What we brought back to the office was the concept that we owned the results of our work. We, as a team, could do this successfully if we all stepped up and agreed that we were going to ensure success. We realized we had control of our destiny. We were very motivated.

And it worked so it is a very cool story! We had all kinds of trouble (such as learning curve for all the new things we had to figure out, one key team member left one month before the end of the project et.) and worked more than we ever had (many long hours). We were successful, the project was on time and the top leaders were very impressed!
So when I am trying to turn around negative attitude in the workplace and get people motivated, I remind people that things don’t happen to us, we make things happen. A little bit corny but it works!

Ten Factors that contribute to the Success of a Business

1. Good Strategy: Sound business strategy tied to organization’s core competency. Strategy is interpreted into what gets done in the organization and the benefits are being realized!
2. Good Employees. They are empowered to do an amazing job and always finding better ways to do things. The employees are good at solving problems. They like to come to work and you aren’t even bribing them with free stuff!
3. Outstanding Leaders. They inspire, they motivate. They know what they are doing and keep up with and handle change brilliantly.
4. Corporate Culture is healthy. People collaborate, brainstorm, share knowledge. People care about their work. Not too much politics. Performance metrics measure the right things – to ensure the organization achieves its goals. For the most part, people get along together well and they are positive, glass half full types.
5. The leaders are on top of things: The business thrives in its industry. Leaders understand their market, stay on top of the industry trends and changes. They understand how to deal with the issues of the industry.
6. The organization can handle constant change. The business has the structure in place to change strategy (and associated execution) when major change occurs in the market. The organization is flexible and adaptable. The organization is agile because it has processes, procedures and standards that are just right – not over done (too much rigidity and processes causing inefficiency) or under done (everyone just does whatever!).
7. The company is proactive, not reactive. Issues are anticipated. Risk is managed. The business is quickly solving problems and making sound, rapid decisions as required to succeed.
8. The organization has creative thinkers and innovators. They are coming up with better ideas than the competition.
9. There are no silos. The functional areas work together!
10. The organization has the information and data they need to make the best decisions at all levels of the organization.

This is my brainstorming on what contributes to corporate success. I would love to hear your ideas. And if some of them sound a bit idealistic, they probably are. I am in a positive mood so that’s where the idealism comes in.

The Relationship of Change, Motivation and Turnaround

At one point in my career, I was a manager in a small, failing division of a large company. I had just started at the company and had not discovered this issue during the hiring process (ah lessons learned!). But here I was in a not so good situation, needing to figure out a way to turn things around.

I knew the problem to be solved – Projects were usually late and our products did not always meet spec. But what was the solution?

Naturally morale was low so this was one of the first issues to deal with. Low morale and low productivity go hand in hand. It was pretty much like being in a sinking ship. Since the employees couldn’t see how to fix things, chances are that most, if not all of them were busy working on their resumes and job searching. They saw the situation as hopeless; we needed to change that attitude.

Strange as it may seem, a new, very huge challenge helped turned us around. We received a new contract to produce something that we were not at all sure we could achieve. We were concerned about schedule, specs, staffing, risk and a lot of unknowns. I convinced the staff that successful completion of this project could turn things around for the division.

We saw this challenge as a way to show our skills and ability. I continued to drive home the concept that this project was the key to our division’s success. Successful completion of this project would bring good return to the division but would also convince our VP that we were a powerful team. We owned this project and were driven to succeed. The fact that this was the biggest challenge we had yet encountered was a great inspiration. We weren’t victims of failure but rather owners of our own success.
It is a good thing that we were motivated and now thinking positively as our lean staff had to work long hours to ensure on time delivery. I found the value of being a hands-on leader on this project. I figured out all kinds of non-conventional ways to help the team (testing equipment for instance) and more conventional ways such as vendor negotiations to bring needed products in quickly.

The project was a success and did indeed convince the company of our division’s value. We kept our eyes on the goal of turnaround all through the long hours and hard work required to achieve this goal. We had a vision of a better division and made it a reality.

How are your IT Systems and Applications Performing?

A thorough analysis of IT applications and systems in most organizations should reveal many opportunities for savings and improved efficiencies. Application rationalization is a process in which an organization’s IT assets are thoroughly reviewed and analyzed to develop a plan for improvements across all systems. Application Portfolio Management (APM) is a process to maintain and optimize the Portfolio of applications and systems.

The Business Drivers for Application Portfolio Management

What are the issues and concerns addressed by Application Rationalization and Application Portfolio Management? The table below shows the issues from the Business Leaders, users, IT Management and software management perspectives.

Issues Driving the Need for Application Rationalization and ongoing Application Portfolio analysis
Business Leaders:
•Inefficient Legacy Systems
•Costly Maintenance
•Business Interruption from System downtime
•Business needs not being met by the IT Initiatives
IT Customer Complaints:
•Takes too long to get information
•Data accuracy is suspect
•Technology issues are affecting the efficiency of the business Processes.
•Cannot obtain reports needed in a timely manner.
•Manual data entry and re-entry is required.
IT Management Pains:
•The IT Asset inventory is too large to be maintained by the limited IT resources.
•The Business does not see the value added from IT investments – Results in IT not having sufficient funds to complete required improvements.
•Database Centralization is needed as data is entered in more than one place manually or kept in individual spreadsheets, or paper forms.
•Systems are not Retired prior to the point where they fail.
Software Management Issues:
•Costs include unused licenses as the license tracking process is inefficient.
•Software is in use that is no longer supported by the vendor.
•Maintenance costs are out of control.
•Duplicate applications for the same purpose.
•Underutilized applications that should be eliminated.

Application rationalization looks at the business processes along with the IT systems, analyzing procedural issues as well as system issues to determine what needs to be improved or fixed.

What Application Portfolio Management does for the business
Application Portfolio Management extends the value of IT to the business by ensuring IT is meeting the business needs. Application Rationalization will provide cost savings and improved efficiency of business processes.

Application Rationalization optimizes the operation of the IT systems and applications, ensures data accuracy and ensures compliance with regulations. From the business perspective, the analysis ties IT to the business strategy and streamlines and improves processes.

Inventory
The first step in the process is to inventory all applications, systems and processes. Questions to be answered for the entire application inventory include:
• How are the applications being used and who uses them?
• What processes does each application support?
• What data is input and output to the application?
• What is being spent to maintain, support, upgrade?
• What is the business value of the application?
• What strategic objectives does the application contribute to?
• What are the technical requirements?
• What is the level of customer satisfaction with the application or system.
• What is the risk associated with the application or system.
• Is there sufficient support for the system?
• Is the system managed and supported well?
Answers to these questions provide a clearer understanding of the state of the IT assets.

Analysis
Application Portfolio Management requires thorough analysis of processes, operations, data and systems to enable good decision making regarding plans for the IT systems and applications. The analysis should look at the relationship of each asset to process, function, capability and data input and output.
Tools used for the analysis include:
• Process flow diagrams,
• Entity Relationship Diagrams for each application,
• Application budget and support costs
• Enterprise Architecture,
• functional and technical specs, user lists,
• help desk data,
• Database Analysis (requirements and data map)
• Data/ Process/ App/ System Relationships
• Associated Process information (process efficiency etc.)
Analysis of this information will identify redundant capability, costly assets (high cost to maintain), determine underutilized assets and highlight downtime issues. This analysis will be combined with the process analysis to determine required activities to optimize the portfolio.

With regard to process, the first questions to be answered: are the processes written and are they accurate? Just like applications, processes need to be easy to use and follow. Feedback from those who use the processes will determine which processes need re-engineering. A review of all processes together will determine gaps, overlaps and areas where the process flow is not optimal. This analysis will also determine opportunities for process automation.

Data accuracy and accessibility are essential to efficiency. Is data entered in more than one place? This would indicate opportunities for integration of systems. Users need to confirm that data is easy to find.

While data is gathered separately for applications and systems, processes and data, the information must be cross referenced. It is important to look at the relationships between the processes, applications and data. Which applications support which processes? What data is collected for each process? Are there labor intensive processes that can be automated? The Application Portfolio analysis will determine improvements for processes, applications, database structure and data collection. Decisions will be made to upgrade, sunset, combine and replace applications.

The analysis provided in application rationalization provides a great opportunity for IT to provide business value in cost savings and improved efficiency. Establishment of an ongoing Application Portfolio Management process ties IT to business as it clearly demonstrates the business value of the IT strategic plan.

Application Portfolio Management is an ongoing process requiring update to the inventory, information, analysis and recommendations as capabilities are added and as applications are retired. In addition, the Application Portfolio must be monitored and re-evaluated to ensure it is contributing to the business strategy.