Why in the world do we need change management?

I hear this question often so I have come up with ideas to help those of us who believe in Change Management convince others of the value.

Background:
Most projects involve people changing. They have to use new technology or they have to use a new process or maybe take on a whole new role because of a reorganization. There are many scenarios and we all know that change takes us out of our comfort zone. You may even have change saturation in the organization.

Why do we need change management? That is touchy feely stuff!
For a new process or technology project, or both, the ROI is generally based on the assumption that users will adopt to the change at go live and will be proficient. What if the people aren’t ready or are resistant to change? Your return will be pushed out and will not be what you expected.

Loss of productivity is an issue whenever you upset the status quo. When people are anxious about a change or resistant to the change, productivity goes down. By working with people to understand the root cause of the resistance, you can minimize this negative impact by helping people understand the business value and personal benefit of the change.

Ultimately projects can fail when change is not handled properly. People can revert to the old way of doing things. There are many business cases out there about major losses caused by failure to pay attention to the people side of the project and properly bring the individuals of the organization through the change.

In summary, Organizational Change Management enables transition to achieve and sustain the desired business strategy and drives ROI through:
– Accelerating the Adoption Curve
– Ensuring Proficiency
– Minimizing the dip in Productivity
– Increasing project success

Let me know if you have other ideas for “selling” change management to those who don’t get it.

We are swamped in change and can’t take anymore!

They say change is constant but what if that is causing the people in your organization to be very grumpy and unhappy? What can we do about change initiatives and about change across the organization? Persuasion, motivation, and listening are good answers! Here are some ideas for helping people work through change in initiatives and across the organization.
• Create Hope
We all know things get better and things get worse, most everything in life is cyclical. Picture the glorious outcome when you successfully change. Think about the movie Pay it forward. I know that when you saw the movie, you thought that was a brilliant idea. Decide to be happy and pay it forward. Ok, before you stop reading this, I know you can’t just decide to be happy and it is as easy as that! Believe me I get that. But please read on, I am hoping to get you to smile!
I used to be a self-help book junkie. If there was a problem, the answer was in a book. So if all else fails, write to me and I will recommend a book. What really made me thing about self-help was that we know what the organization should do to turn things around but we can’t single handedly save the organization. What we have is control over is what we do and think and our own happiness for the most part. We determine how to react to change. When there is too much change (change saturation), managers and leaders need to have an open door policy to get feedback and help employees work through change. The leaders need to recognize change saturation as it leads to failed initiatives, productivity loss and the best people start leaving the company. If your company isn’t handling this correctly, you take control of how you feel about things or you hate going to work.
• Are things really that bad?
Think about it. You aren’t stranded in a boat with an imaginary friend (Cast Away).
I read a great article this morning about a college student writing home to mom and dad. She first tells them to sit down while they are reading the letter (a scary start!). She then proceeds to tell them how she was injured when she jumped out of her dorm window because the place was on fire. While she was in the hospital for 2 weeks, she met a nice guy who let her stay in his basement when she got out because she couldn’t go back to her burnt down dorm. She fell in love and is going to marry the guy because she is pregnant. By this point in the letter mom and/or dad 1. Have fainted or 2. Are having a heart attack or are 3. Beet red and banging their head on the wall. The girl goes on to say that none of this is true but she is getting one D and one F. Great tactic for putting things in perspective! The truth wasn’t as bad as the original story.
Today, I was thinking about the cliché “what doesn’t kill us makes us stronger”. I must be stronger because I am not dead and it has been one of those weeks. It is all about how you look at things.
• Why are we doing this?
That is the big question. Command and control management doesn’t work anymore in most industries. Once you start empowering people they take command of their job and ask a lot of questions. They aren’t going along with you until you answer that question. People internalize change. Moving out of our current state comfort zone takes persuasion. Sell the change. When you talk to your people about the reasons for the change and you start seeing that light come into their eyes, you have finally answered the question why should I do this?
I heard the psychiatrist/ patient light bulb joke turned around last week: How many employees does it take to change a light bulb? One but he/she has to want to change! In reality, before the change takes in an organization, almost everyone who needs to change will also need to want the change.

5 Reasons People don’t like Change

Projects are about improving or fixing things. So it should be easy to get people excited about the change that comes from the completion of a project, right? Not really. People don’t change. Status quo is easier. Here are the top reasons people are resistant to change.
1. Preparing for the change requires a lot of work. We have to learn new processes, systems, and new ways of doing things. This causes anxiety – what if I can’t do my job as well after the process changes? What if the new system is impossible to use?
2. There are uncertainties around change. We really don’t know how things are going to go after the changes are put in place. Uncertainty is scary!
3. The organization usually tells us why this is good for the business, or sometimes not. But what does it do for me? We don’t always get that message and lets face it, what’s in it for me matters. We have to take time out of our very busy schedules to get ready for the change so it helps to have strong motivation. Sometimes leaders don’t provide that motivation.
4. Many of the C levels in organizations didn’t get to the top by worrying about people’s feelings. They are not the touchy-feely type (I didn’t say everyone). They do know how to network and they can be friendly but the CFO doesn’t need to be expert in HR. So worrying about whether the people of the organization have concerns about the major changes in progress often isn’t at the top of the Executive to do list. Unfortunately, you can’t ignore that the people of the organization have to change and there are going to be some negative opinions about almost any change. This has to be taken into consideration and dealt with. Managers have to talk to their reports to understand concerns!

Sunset on the Beach

Sunset on the Beach


5. It could be that the people really understand and want the change. However, if major changes often fail in the organization, there is no trust that this project is going to succeed or even be completed. And one thing we all don’t like is feeling like we are doing a lot of work for something that might be abandoned or just won’t work.
So most Change Management theories say you must win the people of the organization over that the change is great, will be successful and will improve the lives of the members of the organization. Promoting the change as a marketing campaign (with the organization as the audience) can work wonders.

10 Ideas to help ensure People in your Organization are Happy

I wanted to discuss a positive theme today and this came to mind – how to help ensure a happy work force. I read earlier this week that happy people are more productive. So I thought about the places I have worked and put together these points. I am sure there are more ideas and I would like to hear them.

1. Build teams that work well together. This may seem naive and impossible but it can be done. Provide team training so everyone knows how a good team should work. Most work places have some people that aren’t team players. Hopefully you have work where they can be independent.

2. Hire happy, positive people and keep them happy.

3. I don’t know many people who work well in an environment led by a micro manager or dictator type leader. A leader needs to care about the people in the organization. The best leaders have a sense of humor and ability to motivate and inspire.

4. If people can make mistakes without being beaten up over the mistake, more creativity and innovation will occur as people learn from their mistakes and fix problems before it is too late. And the work force will be happier not living in fear of making a mistake.

5. Everyone is motivated differently and has a different personality. Do you recognize individuality? Can you get the best out of your people? People need to be rewarded when they do a good job. This varies quite a bit according the each person’s personality.

6. Everyone appreciates the occasional free lunch or other social events and parties.

7. I don’t know any people who like bosses that yell all the time. Do you?

8. I think most people like friendly, approachable bosses. I certainly do!

9. The leaders of the organization set the core values and the culture. You can make it so that people like coming to work.

10. When people are really overworked, they are not efficient and not happy. Of course this is about life-work balance.

Your thoughts?

Ten Factors that contribute to the Success of a Business

1. Good Strategy: Sound business strategy tied to organization’s core competency. Strategy is interpreted into what gets done in the organization and the benefits are being realized!
2. Good Employees. They are empowered to do an amazing job and always finding better ways to do things. The employees are good at solving problems. They like to come to work and you aren’t even bribing them with free stuff!
3. Outstanding Leaders. They inspire, they motivate. They know what they are doing and keep up with and handle change brilliantly.
4. Corporate Culture is healthy. People collaborate, brainstorm, share knowledge. People care about their work. Not too much politics. Performance metrics measure the right things – to ensure the organization achieves its goals. For the most part, people get along together well and they are positive, glass half full types.
5. The leaders are on top of things: The business thrives in its industry. Leaders understand their market, stay on top of the industry trends and changes. They understand how to deal with the issues of the industry.
6. The organization can handle constant change. The business has the structure in place to change strategy (and associated execution) when major change occurs in the market. The organization is flexible and adaptable. The organization is agile because it has processes, procedures and standards that are just right – not over done (too much rigidity and processes causing inefficiency) or under done (everyone just does whatever!).
7. The company is proactive, not reactive. Issues are anticipated. Risk is managed. The business is quickly solving problems and making sound, rapid decisions as required to succeed.
8. The organization has creative thinkers and innovators. They are coming up with better ideas than the competition.
9. There are no silos. The functional areas work together!
10. The organization has the information and data they need to make the best decisions at all levels of the organization.

This is my brainstorming on what contributes to corporate success. I would love to hear your ideas. And if some of them sound a bit idealistic, they probably are. I am in a positive mood so that’s where the idealism comes in.

The Relationship of Change, Motivation and Turnaround

At one point in my career, I was a manager in a small, failing division of a large company. I had just started at the company and had not discovered this issue during the hiring process (ah lessons learned!). But here I was in a not so good situation, needing to figure out a way to turn things around.

I knew the problem to be solved – Projects were usually late and our products did not always meet spec. But what was the solution?

Naturally morale was low so this was one of the first issues to deal with. Low morale and low productivity go hand in hand. It was pretty much like being in a sinking ship. Since the employees couldn’t see how to fix things, chances are that most, if not all of them were busy working on their resumes and job searching. They saw the situation as hopeless; we needed to change that attitude.

Strange as it may seem, a new, very huge challenge helped turned us around. We received a new contract to produce something that we were not at all sure we could achieve. We were concerned about schedule, specs, staffing, risk and a lot of unknowns. I convinced the staff that successful completion of this project could turn things around for the division.

We saw this challenge as a way to show our skills and ability. I continued to drive home the concept that this project was the key to our division’s success. Successful completion of this project would bring good return to the division but would also convince our VP that we were a powerful team. We owned this project and were driven to succeed. The fact that this was the biggest challenge we had yet encountered was a great inspiration. We weren’t victims of failure but rather owners of our own success.
It is a good thing that we were motivated and now thinking positively as our lean staff had to work long hours to ensure on time delivery. I found the value of being a hands-on leader on this project. I figured out all kinds of non-conventional ways to help the team (testing equipment for instance) and more conventional ways such as vendor negotiations to bring needed products in quickly.

The project was a success and did indeed convince the company of our division’s value. We kept our eyes on the goal of turnaround all through the long hours and hard work required to achieve this goal. We had a vision of a better division and made it a reality.

Keeping Calm under Pressure

I am seeing companies out there asking for people who work well under pressure. I thought everyone was good at that because there are always plenty of issues and challenges in the workplace. But I have seen a lot of different attitudes when difficulties occur in the business. Here are some attitudes that are all wrong for dealing with business challenges:
1. Ignore the problem and it will go away. NOT!
2. Hand this off to someone else. You can collaborate with others, run your solution by others but complete handoff is not something you can do and expect to go anywhere in your career. We all need to be problem solvers. If you feel you must push this further up the chain of command, at least offer your ideas on resolution of the problem.
3. Let out your frustrations and rant and yell about who is to blame. I don’t think anyone sees this as working well under pressure but I have been amazed to see high level people get away with this. I do think this is becoming less common though.

So how should you deal with pressure, issues, challenges and downright disaster?
1. Remain calm and analyze the problem. What is the root cause of the issue and potential solutions?
2. Keep a positive attitude and open mind. I got this idea from people I have worked with. They say that when I worked under great pressure, I kept a positive attitude, which in turn helped keep my teams motivated. Negativity is not productive or motivating, generally this just leads to the issues not getting resolved quickly.
3. Negotiate. Some of the biggest pressures I have encountered related to the customer (internal or external) wanting it now (schedule problem) and wanting it cheap (budget problem) and wanting all the bells and whistles (scope problem). I have found that it is good to find out the prioritization of scope, schedule, cost according to the client. Which of these constraints is most critical? If it is schedule, tell them what you can do by that date and how you would phase the rest of the solution. If it is money, convince them they will have what they need without every last bell and whistle.
4. Corporate culture is key to dealing with issues. If the organization punishes people for reporting problems, there will be more problems. If the organization is consistently looking at performance, proactively anticipating issues and risks while planning mitigation and empowering people to solve problems, the business is likely to run smoother.
5. As I mentioned in item 2 above, your best move might be to all take a deep breath and remind yourselves that panicking doesn’t resolve anything. Then get people together and brainstorm solutions.
6. Keep the issue in perspective. Is this something people will even remember in a day, week or month? Is it possible you will laugh about this later?
7. Plan on getting your frustrations out from all the pressure at work by exercising – the number one stress reliever!
What are your ideas for keeping calm under pressure? If employees are constantly seeking this in their workforce, its a good idea for everyone to work on this.